Hyundai does not recommend an engine flush during routine service

I recently had my Hyundai Tucson services with the Hyundai authorised dealer recommending an engine flush, even prior to inspecting the vehicle. An ‘engine flush’ clears the gunk out of your engine by pouring a chemical into the engine and idling. Due to the use of chemicals, it can possibly be damaging to modern car’s engines.

I was concerned due to no mentioned of an engine flush in the Hyundai Recommended Maintenance Schedules, so I contact Hyundai directly, this was their response:

I have been in contact with our technical department both locally and overseas and they have advised that Hyundai don’t recommend an [engine] flush at service.

Is a mobile phone steering wheel mount legal in Australia?

It is well known that mobile phones need to be “secured in a mounting affixed to the vehicle” in Australia, but does a mobile phone secured in a mount affixed to the steering wheel, a “phone steering wheel mount”,  meet this requirement?Is a mobile phone steering wheel mount legal in Australia?

I emailed the Western Australia Road Safety Commission to clarify, and whilst it may meet the secured in a mount requirement it produces a number of additional problems.

The response is below.

Please be advised that, while it may meet the definition of a mounting for the purpose of the mobile phone regulations, there are a number of issues which are of concern. These include:

  • It may interfere with the deployment of the air bag;
  • It may become a projectile when struck by the airbag;
  • It obscures the instruments, notably the speedometer, or (if installed the other way up) the road ahead;
  • As it occupies such a large proportion of the steering wheel’s circumference it is our view that it does compromise proper control.

On this basis, I believe it would contravene vehicle standards regulations most notably Reg. 235(5) of the Road Traffic (Vehicles) Regulations 2014 which covers changes or alterations to the body or equipment of a vehicle in a way that adversely affects the safe operation of the vehicle.

Repair a punctured tyre with tire repair strips

Caution: this guide is a demonstration of how to use the product, it should not be applied to the tyre sidewall.

Here is a quick post on how to repair a minor puncture on a car’s tyre. I purchased a car tyre repair kit from eBay for $5.50 including postage. Here’s what I received;

  • A raspier tool for enlarging the hole,
  • A needle insertion tool for inserting the repair strips,
  • A small tube of rubber adhesive, and
  • Five tyre repair strips.

Puncture repair kit, tools, adhesive and strips
Five tyre repair strips

How to repair a puncture

A puncture to the tyre's side wall

First remove a repair strip and insert it into the need hole of the insertion tool, this was the most difficult and used some pliers to help me pull it though, I was surprised and happy that the repair strips were not sticky at all. Pull the strip so it is centred in the insertion tool.

Insert a strip into the insertion tool

Cover the strip with copious amounts of rubber adhesive, this will assist with the strip sticking to the inside of the tyre. Insert the needle insertion tool (with the strip) into the tyre hole, don’t insert it all the way down, but ensure both ends are still protruding.

Now twist the insertion tool slighty (this will get it all knotted inside) before pulling it out of the hole, you may need to use some pliers to ensure the strip remains inside.

Insert the strip into the puncture

Inflate the tyre and ensure no leaks